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AdWords A/B Testing [Proved by AdWords Experiments]

If you are a marketer you probably carry out AdWords experiments as without simple things like A/B testing you’ll never know which settings, landings, and texts work better for your business.

We will talk about AdWords A/B testing in this article. Hopefully, the info compiled here will let you carry out your own AdWords campaign experiments more efficiently.

What is AdWords A/B split testing & how you can benefit from it

An A/B test is a randomized experiment that uses two or more variants of the same AdWords texts (A and B). Variant A is the original. Variants B and the rest of the options contain one or more elements that are modified compared to the original. In some experiments, variant B may be a completely different version of AdWords text.
Each variant is demonstrated at similar times which makes it possible to observe its performance and measure independently of any external factors. Want to limit your experiment to a specific audience? Use targeting.

What are AdWords campaign drafts and experiments & how they work

To run an AdWords A/B testing you need to create a campaign draft and start an experiment. Down below we will tell you what is campaign draft and how AdWords campaign drafts and experiments work.

About Google AdWords campaign drafts and experiments

AdWords campaign drafts and experiments allow you to propose and test changes to your Search and Display Network campaigns. Drafts are used to prepare multiple changes to a campaign. You have two options from there: to either apply your draft’s changes back to the original campaign or use your draft to create an experiment. What do you need the experiments for? They enable you to measure your results to understand the impact of your changes before you apply them to a campaign.
Please view this video to see how to create draft campaigns and experiments in AdWords:

AdWords drafts: how campaign drafts work

Drafts let you prepare multiple changes to a campaign without affecting its performance. Creating a draft can be compared to mirroring your campaign’s setup. From there, you can make amendments to your draft just as you would in a normal campaign. You can leave and come back to your draft to make additional changes to it, or even discard the entire draft at any moment.
After having finished making changes to the draft, you can apply it to the original campaign or create an experiment to test how your changes perform against it.

AdWords campaign experiments: how campaign experiments work

Upon finishing the draft you can convert it to an experiment instead of applying your changes to your original campaign. Normally, you’ll have multiple drafts for one given campaign, but only one of those drafts can run as an experiment at a time. On setting up your experiment, you can specify the time of its duration and what part of traffic and budget you would like to use.
Here’s how it works: when a potential customer performs a search on Google or browse a partner website, or loads a webpage on the Display Network, either your original campaign or your experiment is randomly activated for the auction. It depends on how you’ve split the traffic share between your campaign and your experiment.
Running your experiment, you can monitor and compare the performance against your original campaign. You can change the experiment’s dates if you want to finish it. If you see that your experiment performs better than your original campaign, you may consider applying it to the original campaign. You also have the possibility of converting your experiment into a new campaign having the same dates and budget as your original campaign and pause your original campaign.

How to create an AdWords campaign draft and start an experiment

First of all set up a campaign draft

You can create drafts for Search and Display Network campaigns. We have already mentioned above that creating a draft, you’re mirroring your campaign’s setup. This lets you prepare a number of changes to a campaign without impacting its performance.
Drafts are only available for Search and Display Network campaigns. This means you won’t be able to create a draft for Video, App, or Shopping campaigns.
Read on and you will get an outline of how to create a draft.

Before you start

You need an existing campaign to set up a draft.

Instructions

  1. Sign in to your AdWords account.
  2. Click the Campaigns tab at the top.
  3. In the table, click the name of the campaign that you’d like to make a draft of.
  4. Click the Draft drop-down in the upper-right corner, then select Create new.
  5. Enter a name of your draft, then click Create.
  6. You’ll be taken to your new draft. Any changes you make to the draft will be automatically saved. You can leave your draft and finish doing your changes anytime.
  7. Once you’re happy with your draft, you can apply your changes to the original campaign or create an experiment.

Bear in mind

Campaign drafts differ from drafts created in AdWords Editor. Though these are both ways to prepare changes to a campaign, campaign drafts can be used to create an experiment, whereas drafts in AdWords Editor are campaigns that you don’t want to export to your account yet.

Do you follow us so far? Here goes a brief visual part of our tutorial.

Enter the Draft & experiments tabs

Create a new campaign draft

Insert necessary amendments to the draft

As soon as you have created a draft, you can prepare changes to it without impacting the original campaign’s performance. From here, you can also edit, filter, or remove your drafts. You can apply your drafts to the original campaign or create an experiment from it as well.

Set up a campaign experiment

Before you start

You need to create a draft before you set up a campaign experiment.

Instructions

Set up an experiment

  1. Sign in to your AdWords account.
  2. Click All drafts from the menu on the left, then click the name of the draft you’d like to edit.
  3. Click the Apply… button in the top right corner.
  4. Select Run an experiment
  5. Enter your experiment name. Your experiment shouldn’t share the same name as your campaigns and other experiments.
  6. Choose a start date for your experiment.
  7. If you’d like to manually end your experiment, select “No end date.” Otherwise, choose an end date for your experiment.
  8. Enter a percentage of the original campaign’s traffic you’d like to allocate to your experiment. This is also the percentage of the original campaign’s budget you’ll be allocating to your experiment.
  9. Click Create to finish creating your experiment.

What can you do when you’re ready to end your experiment?

If you’re satisfied with the result of your experiment, you can apply it to the original campaign or convert your experiment into a new campaign.

  • If you apply your experiment to your original campaign, the changes you were testing there will be applied to your original campaign.
  • If you convert your experiment into a new campaign, your original campaign will be paused and your experiment will show up in “All Campaigns” with the same budget and dates as your original campaign.

In both cases, your experiment’s performance data will be preserved.

If you want to end your experiment, you can do that by changing the end date of your experiment and it will stop running at the end of the day. Before you begin

Then comes the time of observing the experiments’ results and arriving at the conclusions.

Monitor your campaign experiments

After you’ve started running an experiment, you want to understand how to perform its monitoring. When you see how your experiment is performing in comparison to the original campaign, you can make a deliberate decision about whether to end your experiment, apply it to the original campaign, or use it to create a new campaign.

Below we explain how to monitor and understand the performance of your experiment.

How to interpret the data you’ve got

You’ll see a comparison of the experiment’s key metrics with that of the original campaign along with arrows next to each metric in the table near the top.

  • The arrows’ direction indicates if the experiment values are more or less than the original campaigns.
  • The number of arrows indicates statistical significance, or, in other words, the likelihood of differences that didn’t occur by chance. Three arrows can appear in the same direction. The more arrows appear, the more certain you can be that that the difference isn’t due to chance.
  • A diamond indicates that the results aren’t statistically significant. These are some of the reasons that might have caused such result:
    • Your experiment hasn’t had enough time to run.
    • Your campaign doesn’t receive enough traffic.
    • Your traffic split was too small and your experiment isn’t receiving enough traffic.
    • The changes you’ve made haven’t resulted in a statistically significant performance difference.
  • Experiments with more statistically significant results are more likely to continue performing with similar results after they’re converted to a campaign.

If the draft campaign was more efficient, you can apply the relevant changes to the existing campaign.

How to apply your draft’s changes to the original campaign

After you apply a draft to a campaign, the campaign will reflect the changes you made in your draft. Remember that a draft will be no longer available for editing after it’s applied to a campaign.

Before you start

If you haven’t yet created a draft, set up a campaign draft.

Instructions

Apply draft changes to the original campaign

  1. Sign in to your AdWords account.
  2. Click All drafts from the menu in the left, then click the name of the draft you’d like to edit.
  3. Click the Apply… button in the top right corner.
  4. Select Update your original campaign.

That’s it! We have just run through the whole process of creating, running, and summing up Google AdWords A/B testing campaign drafts and experiments. Now we would like to hear your feedback on the above information. Do you consider it useful? Do you often run AdWords split testing? Does it help you hit the target with your marketing campaigns? Your stories and experience are welcome in the comments.

AdWords A/B Testing [Proved by AdWords Experiments]
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2018-05-07T08:27:42+00:00 May 7th, 2018|

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